Hand in Hand is a national network of employers of nannies, housecleaners and home attendants working for dignified and respectful working conditions that benefit the employer and worker alike.

Photo of staff holding Hand in Hand banner

Mission

Hand in Hand is building a just and caring economy starting in our homes and communities. We support employers of nannies, house cleaners, home care workers, and attendants, their families and allies to understand that their homes are workplaces. We organize people to demand dignity and fairness for domestic workers, and to win public investment in care for families, people with disabilities and older adults.  

Vision

We envision a world that values domestic work as fundamental to building a just and caring economy. A world that celebrates every person’s humanity and belonging, and repairs our country’s legacies of systemic injustice.  A world where all people can access and afford the childcare and home care we need to live whole lives with dignity. A world in which we depend on one another, and build collective solutions together.  

Core Values

  • Workers’ rights and dignity
  • Social justice and intersectionality
  • Interdependence
  • Collective power

History

Hand in Hand was founded in 2010 by a group of domestic employers and their allies who had worked side by side with domestic workers to support the passage of the New York State Domestic Worker Bill of Rights.

After the campaign succeeded, participants agreed that one key element had been the participation of Jewish employers. Organized by Jews for Racial & Economic Justice, they testified for domestic worker rights throughout the campaign. With encouragement from the MacArthur-winning labor organizer Ai-jen Poo, Danielle Feris founded Hand in Hand in partnership with Poo’s National Domestic Workers Alliance to continue to collaborate in future campaigns and efforts to address the common interests of workers and employers nationwide, whose lives are so intimately connected.

From a small, volunteer-led organization, Hand in Hand has grown into a staffed nonprofit organization with a strong national leadership, and growing influence around the country.

Work With Us

Want to work at the intersections of labor, feminism, racial justice, economic equality, immigration, and more? Then you might like working with us on the issues that affect the domestic workforce and domestic employers.

Our Work

Righting a historic wrong based in racism and sexism

Righting a historic wrong based in racism and sexism


Although domestic workers are professionals who do real work every day, they are excluded from many of the basic protections guaranteed by the Fair Labor Standards Act to most other workers in the United States.


This is because in the 1930s, domestic workers were excluded from most New Deal-era labor laws: In an effort to control the African-American workforce, Southern politicians refused to sign legislation that included domestic workers and farm workers.


Many domestic workers still don’t earn a living wage and work without access to health care, paid sick days, or paid time off.
Moreover, because domestic workers’ workplaces are inside other people’s homes, the struggles domestic workers face are largely out of the public spotlight.


Hand in Hand helps employers recognize that their homes are workplaces—and that we have both legal obligations and opportunities to make our homes workplaces that they can be proud of.  


Through education, advocacy, organizing, and cultural change, we aim to address power imbalance between workers and employers and challenge the ways our culture devalues care work.

Making it more affordable and accessible to get support

Making it more affordable and accessible to get support

Childcare and support for people with disabilities and seniors are simply unaffordable for a great number of people in this country.

Individual employers should not have to shoulder the burden that results from the lack of a comprehensive care infrastructure to support families ― and domestic workers should not have to bear the brunt of this systemic failure.

We need to transform the care industry so that all kinds of care throughout the life spectrum are affordable and accessible to all those who need it.  

Who are Hand in Hand members?

Who are Hand in Hand members?

We are diverse group, including:

  • low- and middle-income people with disabilities who employ home attendants
  • working parents who hire childcare workers
  • seniors who need long-term care
  • “sandwich generation” individuals who support both their children and their parents
  • individuals who employ domestic workers to help clean and manage their homes.

We believe that all our challenges are connected.

Why do employers join Hand in Hand?

Why do employers join Hand in Hand?

  • Needing support and resources: Many people who employ domestic workers are navigating their own care needs while seeking to realize their commitment to fair employment practices.
  • Finding a community:  This helps people combat isolation and share common experiences of employing home attendants or childcare providers, including feeling personally transformed by their relationship with the worker they employ.
  • Engaging in a movement with shared values: Domestic employers who seek to foster a fair workplace in their homes are often grounded in values of justice, workers rights, awareness that the personal is political, and recognition of the complexity of people’s lives and multiple identities as employers.

Events

Upcoming Events
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
This message is only visible to admins.
Problem displaying Facebook posts. Backup cache in use.
Error: API access disrupted. Go to the App Dashboard and complete Data Use Checkup.
Type: OAuthException
This Halloween - Treat Us with Dignity! HCBS Now!

This Halloween - Treat Us with Dignity! HCBS Now!

October 28, 2021, 11:45am - October 28, 2021, 1:00pm

Civic Center/UN Plaza stationSan Francisco, CA Map

Not enough Home and Community Based Services is SCARY!
Treat us this Halloween with full funding for HCBS!

You’re invited!
Let’s ensure that the Build Back Better Infrastructure Plan with full funding for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) is passed this Fall.

Join us as we pass out a sweet call to action, deliver treats to Speaker Pelosi for her leadership on Build Back Better & Share Our HCBS stories.

RSVP today! www.bit.ly/HalloweenHCBS (Can’t join in person? There’ll be a zoom component. RSVP for details.)

Dress up in something spooky and bring signs with hashtags: #BuildBackBetter #HCBS #CareIsEssential #BeBraveDontCave #TreatUsWithDignity

After months of negotiations, Congressional Democrats and the White House have negotiated a deal to pass a major infrastructure package that includes a critical investment for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). That's why we're dressing up and delivering some treats to Pelosi and San Francisco residents saying- we can’t stop now! Let’s pass this bill and help ensure homecare providers and consumers get the support they need.

Organized by the Long-term Services and Supports for All Grassroots Coalition, including: CA Alliance of Retired Americans (CARA), the Disability Organizing Network, the CA Domestic Workers Coalition, The San Francisco Women's Collective, Senior and Disability Action, United Domestic Workers AFSCME, Jobs with Justice SF, SEIU 1021 Retirees, SEIU 2015, the Gray Panthers, California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC), Caring Across Generations, Filipino Advocates for Justice, and Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network.
... See MoreSee Less

5 interested  ·  8 going
Past Events
Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
This message is only visible to admins.
Problem displaying Facebook posts. Backup cache in use.
Error: API access disrupted. Go to the App Dashboard and complete Data Use Checkup.
Type: OAuthException
This Halloween - Treat Us with Dignity! HCBS Now!

This Halloween - Treat Us with Dignity! HCBS Now!

October 28, 2021, 11:45am - October 28, 2021, 1:00pm

Civic Center/UN Plaza stationSan Francisco, CA Map

Not enough Home and Community Based Services is SCARY!
Treat us this Halloween with full funding for HCBS!

You’re invited!
Let’s ensure that the Build Back Better Infrastructure Plan with full funding for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) is passed this Fall.

Join us as we pass out a sweet call to action, deliver treats to Speaker Pelosi for her leadership on Build Back Better & Share Our HCBS stories.

RSVP today! www.bit.ly/HalloweenHCBS (Can’t join in person? There’ll be a zoom component. RSVP for details.)

Dress up in something spooky and bring signs with hashtags: #BuildBackBetter #HCBS #CareIsEssential #BeBraveDontCave #TreatUsWithDignity

After months of negotiations, Congressional Democrats and the White House have negotiated a deal to pass a major infrastructure package that includes a critical investment for Home and Community Based Services (HCBS). That's why we're dressing up and delivering some treats to Pelosi and San Francisco residents saying- we can’t stop now! Let’s pass this bill and help ensure homecare providers and consumers get the support they need.

Organized by the Long-term Services and Supports for All Grassroots Coalition, including: CA Alliance of Retired Americans (CARA), the Disability Organizing Network, the CA Domestic Workers Coalition, The San Francisco Women's Collective, Senior and Disability Action, United Domestic Workers AFSCME, Jobs with Justice SF, SEIU 1021 Retirees, SEIU 2015, the Gray Panthers, California Foundation for Independent Living Centers (CFILC), Caring Across Generations, Filipino Advocates for Justice, and Hand in Hand: The Domestic Employers Network.
... See MoreSee Less

5 interested  ·  8 going
Your Home is Someone's Workplace! How to Hire a House Cleaner, Nanny or Homecare Worker

Your Home is Someone's Workplace! How to Hire a House Cleaner, Nanny or Homecare Worker

October 26, 2021, 6:00pm - October 26, 2021, 6:45pm

Los Angeles Map

Join Hand in Hand for a 45-min online webinar on best practices for hiring and employing a housecleaner, nanny or homecare attendant.

In this webinar, participants will learn about the domestic worker industry and the best practices as well as legal requirements when hiring and employing a domestic worker.

Register HERE: secure.everyaction.com/IOkXlbfSXUSP1WzK8VeW9w2
... See MoreSee Less

12 interested  ·  4 going
NYC Care Campaign Meeting with Special Guest: Felicia Singh

NYC Care Campaign Meeting with Special Guest: Felicia Singh

October 25, 2021, 8:30pm - October 25, 2021, 9:30pm

Join us for our bi-weekly NYC Care Campaign virtual meeting on Monday, October 25th at 8:30pm for a special conversation on care with special guest: Felicia Singh, NYC Council Candidate in District 32.

RSVP: bit.ly/NYCCare1025

If you have any questions, please email Ximena at [email protected]
•••
Únase a nosotres para nuestra reunión virtual quincenal de NYC Care Campaign el Lunes 25 de Octubre a las 8:30pm para una conversación especial sobre el cuidado con un invitada especial: Felicia Singh, la candidata al Concejo Municipal del Distrito 32.

RSVP: bit.ly/NYCCare1025

Si tiene alguna pregunta, por favor envíe un correo electrónico a Ximena a [email protected]
... See MoreSee Less

2 interested  ·  5 going
Disability Justice: Visioning Our Future

Disability Justice: Visioning Our Future

October 7, 2021, 6:00pm

Join Hand in Hand members Elaine Shelly & Katy Carroll to talk about why disability justice can't wait. Share your vision for an interdependent future and learn about how we're working to achieve that future by dismantling policy that doesn't work and building and fighting for policy that does.

This event will be in English with closed captioning, sign language interpretation, and Tagalog interpretation. Please share other access needs with the hosts and we will do our best to accommodate.
... See MoreSee Less

12 interested  ·  6 going
SB 321 Faith Leader Letter Delivery

SB 321 Faith Leader Letter Delivery

September 23, 2021, 11:00am

Tune in to witness a delegation of faith, domestic worker and employer leaders deliver a letter to Governor Newsom from over 100 faith leaders asking him to support health and safety protections for domestic workers and sign Senate Bill 321 into law.
Unase para mirar una delegación de líderes de fe, trabajadoras del hogar y empleadores domésticos entregan una carta al gobernador Newsom de más de 100 líderes religiosos pidiéndole que apoye las protecciones de salud y seguridad para los trabajadores domésticos y que firme el Proyecto de Ley 321 del Senado. #SB321 #HealthandSafetyNow #SaludYSeguridadYA
... See MoreSee Less

2 interested  ·  2 going

Facebook Feed

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
This message is only visible to admins.
Problem displaying Facebook posts. Backup cache in use.
Error: API access disrupted. Go to the App Dashboard and complete Data Use Checkup.
Type: OAuthException
Stacy Kono honors her mother, Grace Kono:

My mom has been a caring and patient caregiver to my dad as hes navigated a Parkinsons diagnosis earlier this year. While my sisters and I support them both, my mom gives the most time and attention to making sure my dad drinks water, takes his medications, and gets his sleep and exercise. I see her bring joy into caregiving by initiating board games with my dad and working together on crossword puzzles. I know shes done everything she could this last year to keep both of them safe during the pandemic too. I honor my mom, Grace Kono, for the love and care she brings to my dad every day.

#HonorDomesticWork
If you haven’t yet, don’t forget to VOTE tomorrow, November 2nd - Election Day!

We honor the dreams and courage of Rosa Ramírez Guerrero, featured by @National Domestic Workers Alliance A History of Domestic Work and Worker Organizing project:

Rosa Ramírez Guerrero, 1934-

Daring to Dream

“If I can touch a life and make them feel good about themselves that is food for me, food for them, food for the world. We are here to help others.”

Rosa Ramírez Guerrero began cleaning houses in El Paso, Texas when she was ten years old. She recalled, “I remember going in at seven or eight o’clock in the morning and cleaning five bathrooms, getting on my hands and knees, scrubbing, putting wax, polishing, and all that. And there were no machines as such, polishing machines or anything like that. But it was joy — those fifty cents were mine!”

The women in Rosa’s family had big dreams and domestic work provided an avenue for realizing them. Rosa’s grandmother joined the Mexican Revolution (1910-20) by working as a cook for Pancho Villa. This took her out into the world, far from her hometown in Toluca, Mexico. Rosa’s mother also worked as a maid and laundress “because she didn’t know English and she didn’t have an education as such…. [S]he worked very hard. For a dollar a week, she used to work and scrub by hand, wash all the linen and boil them.” Her wages sustained her family.

The border was a place of cultural inspiration for Rosa. She joined a dance company when she was only seven. She paid for dance lessons by cleaning homes.

Rosa would grow up to become a dance educator, bilingual teacher, writer, and producer. She was a teacher in the El Paso schools for twenty years, and then taught part-time at the University of Texas in El Paso. In both positions, she was one of very few Latinas. In 1970, she founded the International Folklórico Dance Group to teach young people cultural literacy in folk dances from around the world. Today a school in El Paso is named in her honor, The Rosa Guerrero Elementary School.

© Jennifer Guglielmo & Michelle Joffroy

❤️Learn more about Latina domestic workers building their power in the U.S. Mexico borderlands in this documentary film on domestic worker history:

Image: Cece Carpio

#HonorDomesticWork
... See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago
We honor the dreams and courage of Rosa Ramírez Guerrero, featured by @National Domestic Workers Alliance A History of Domestic Work and Worker Organizing project:  

Rosa Ramírez Guerrero, 1934-

Daring to Dream

“If I can touch a life and make them feel good about themselves that is food for me, food for them, food for the world. We are here to help others.” 

Rosa Ramírez Guerrero began cleaning houses in El Paso, Texas when she was ten years old. She recalled, “I remember going in at seven or eight o’clock in the morning and cleaning five bathrooms, getting on my hands and knees, scrubbing, putting wax, polishing, and all that. And there were no machines as such, polishing machines or anything like that. But it was joy — those fifty cents were mine!” 

The women in Rosa’s family had big dreams and domestic work provided an avenue for realizing them. Rosa’s grandmother joined the Mexican Revolution (1910-20) by working as a cook for Pancho Villa. This took her out into the world, far from her hometown in Toluca, Mexico. Rosa’s mother also worked as a maid and laundress “because she didn’t know English and she didn’t have an education as such…. [S]he worked very hard. For a dollar a week, she used to work and scrub by hand, wash all the linen and boil them.” Her wages sustained her family.
 
The border was a place of cultural inspiration for Rosa. She joined a dance company when she was only seven. She paid for dance lessons by cleaning homes. 

Rosa would grow up to become a dance educator, bilingual teacher, writer, and producer. She was a teacher in the El Paso schools for twenty years, and then taught part-time at the University of Texas in El Paso. In both positions, she was one of very few Latinas. In 1970, she founded the International Folklórico Dance Group to teach young people cultural literacy in folk dances from around the world. Today a school in El Paso is named in her honor, The Rosa Guerrero Elementary School.

© Jennifer Guglielmo & Michelle Joffroy

❤️Learn more about Latina domestic workers building their power in the U.S. Mexico borderlands in this documentary film on domestic worker history: https://vimeo.com/wemakehistory/v2

Image: Cece Carpio

#HonorDomesticWork

We honor the legacy and leadership of Josephine "Jo" Hulett, featured by National Domestic Workers Alliance A History of Domestic Work and Worker Organizing project:

Josephine "Jo" Hulett (1927-2011) formed a domestic workers' rights group in Youngstown, Ohio in 1968. Her ability to speak powerfully about her experiences resonated with other workers. As with many successful organizers, storytelling became her "signature strategy," as historian Premilla Nadasen has written.

In 1970, Hulett became the full-time field organizer for the National Committee on Household Employment (NCHE). In the 1960s, the NCHE had been an organization of employers whose main focus was to train domestic workers. But that changed when they hired Edith Barksdale Sloan as executive director in 1969. Many of the women in her family did domestic work, and she was determined to organize domestic workers into their own movement to empower one another and organize to transform the occupation.

Sloan hired Hulett to help her build a national organization of domestic workers. Hulett traveled across the country to meet with workers, support their organizing, and serve as the liaison between their groups. She recalled their "need to feel that someone can say it like it is…. So that other women who are household workers may be able to connect with my story, and see what we can do together to change our lives."

Hulett and Sloan worked together to build the movement from the bottom up. Their annual conference was an important opportunity for domestic workers from across the country to come together, strategize, and build community and solidarity. It was at their first conference in 1971, where they formed the Household Technicians of America.

© Jennifer Guglielmo

#HonorDomesticWork
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago
We honor the legacy and leadership of  Josephine Jo Hulett, featured by National Domestic Workers Alliance A History of Domestic Work and Worker Organizing project: 

Josephine Jo Hulett (1927-2011) formed a domestic workers rights group in Youngstown, Ohio in 1968. Her ability to speak powerfully about her experiences resonated with other workers. As with many successful organizers, storytelling became her signature strategy, as historian Premilla Nadasen has written. 

In 1970, Hulett became the full-time field organizer for the National Committee on Household Employment (NCHE). In the 1960s, the NCHE had been an organization of employers whose main focus was to train domestic workers. But that changed when they hired Edith Barksdale Sloan as executive director in 1969. Many of the women in her family did domestic work, and she was determined to organize domestic workers into their own movement to empower one another and organize to transform the occupation. 

Sloan hired Hulett to help her build a national organization of domestic workers. Hulett traveled across the country to meet with workers, support their organizing, and serve as the liaison between their groups. She recalled their need to feel that someone can say it like it is…. So that other women who are household workers may be able to connect with my story, and see what we can do together to change our lives. 

Hulett and Sloan worked together to build the movement from the bottom up. Their annual conference was an important opportunity for domestic workers from across the country to come together, strategize, and build community and solidarity. It was at their first conference in 1971, where they formed the Household Technicians of America. 

© Jennifer Guglielmo

#HonorDomesticWork